Stop The Madness

Get To The Heart of the Matter

All madness stems from too much head and too little heart.

I’m not talking about certifiable insanity but the regular, daily madness that drives us crazy.

The way out of any challenge is to find a point of hopeful willingness. That’s the point where you can clearly see a next step action and you feel inspired to take it.

That point doesn’t come from over-thinking. It doesn’t come from asking why. And it seldom comes from searching for a better how to. Those are all head games and head games are complex.

Instead you must get to the heart of the matter in two different ways.

1). The first way is to go deep, connect with your heartfelt desires and come from within out.

Ask yourself.

Deep in my heart what do I care about the most here? If I put my dear self first in an extraordinary demonstration of self-love what might I do? What do I really want?

If you are looking too much at outside conditions and circumstances you’re looking in the wrong place.

2). The second way to get to the heart of the matter is, to boil it down to its essence.

Brevity creates clarity and clarity empowers. Boiling it down best occurs with persistent, audacious inquiry. Ask yourself.

What’s really going on here? What else? If I could answer the question that would save my ass, what would that question be?

Stay with the inquiry until you hit upon a startling truth that smells very clean and fresh.

Combine that truth/action in service of what you really want and the madness will stop.

It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been down or what’s going on around you. What matters is in your heart. What matters is getting to core, boiled down clarity and acting now.

There is no limit to the number of fresh starts you can make.
Audacious inquiry will save you every time.

Comments

  1. As the great Socrates said… The unexamined life is not worth living.. to which I respond, Word.

  2. Henway – Yes, I can’t imagine living any other way.

  3. I’m a fan of finding the essence and I like your inquiry-based approach.

  4. Chris Edgar says:

    Hi Tom — I’ve definitely been deep into this recently, and this exploration can be a painful one that sometimes seems futile. But somehow I keep doing the exploration, and there’s a part of me that is sure that it’s valuable. It sounds like you’ve come to that conclusion too.

  5. J.D. – I find that deep inquiry always leads to a better and more inner informed place of wisdom.

    Chris – Yes. We really have no choice but d to dig deeply into our own fears and vulnerabilities. There is gold on the other side.

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